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Moon Over The Brewery Through February 8

Miriam Walsyk, unmarried and living with her 14 year old daughter, Amanda, works as a waitress to pay the bills, but painting is her passion.  Subjects are scarce in the drab Pennsylvania coal town where they live, so Miriam dons a miner's lamp and paints by moonlight to soften  the stark landscape. Miriam also desires a man in her life, a need which the precocious Amanda discourages with her barbed comments. Amanda compensates for the lack of a father by creating an imaginary friend, Randolph, who appears (only to her) providing mischievous advice and guidance. Enter Warren Zimmerman, a simple mailman who, at first, appears to be a perfect target for Amanda's caustic remarks until he quietly but firmly beats Amanda at her own game. A touching, humorous study of a precocious teenager's "coming of age," in which fantasy and reality are deftly juxtaposed.

 

 Breaking Up Is Hard To Do February 21 - March 22

Marge and her stage struck best friend Lois arrive at Esther's Paradise Resort in the Catskills on Labor Day weekend in 1960, on a vacation that was intended to be Marge's honeymoon until the groom left her at the altar. Lois attempts to console Marge by setting her up with the resort's handsome, self-obsessed singer Del Delmanaco, but her plans backfire when Del mistakenly assumes that Marge's father can further his ambitions to become the next teen hearthrob on American Bandstand. Gazing forlornly at Marge from the wings is a geekish cabana boy and aspiring songwriter Gabe. When he isn't entertaining the guests with classic, but still comical Borscht Belt Shtick, house comic Harvey secretly carries a torch for widowed resort owner Esther, who is more preoccupied trying to keep her resort open. 18 Neil Sedaka hits are incorporated into these doings, reviviung memories and merriment as the music our parents told us was "too loud", takes center stage.

 

Pygmalion April 4 - May 3

One of George Bernard Shaw’s finest plays; a smash hit in London’s West End and on Broadway, Pygmalion has won additional acclaim with Gabriel Pascal’s 1938 motion picture adaptation and achieved further notice in 1956 when it was adapted into the musical My Fair Lady, which was also later a successful film. In this seminal comedy of class distinctions, fussy British phonetics professor, Henry Higgins wagers that he can transform guttersnipe cockney flower girl, Eliza Doolittle into a lady of breeding, voice and manners in London’s Ascot Society, with surprising results. This classic comedy is bound to bring a smile to everyone’s face as it graces the OBT stage.

 

The Merchant of Venice  May 16 - June 14

The Merchant of Venice is an intriguing drama of love, greed and revenge. At its heart, the play contrasts the characters of the maddened and vengeful Shylock, a Venetian money lender with the gracious, level-headed Portia, a wealthy young woman besieged by suitors. At the play's climax, Shylock insists that a binding contract be enforced which will cost the life of the merchant Antonio. Pleading Antonio's case before the Duke of Venice, Portia shrewdly defeats Shylock’s evil intent. Shakespeare’s classic tale will appear on the OBT stage just as Summer returns. (Yes, Bob got one choice.)

 

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels June 27 - July 26

Based on the popular 1988 film,  DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS  centers on two con men living on the French Riviera. Lawrence Jameson makes his lavish living by talking rich ladies out of their money. Freddy Benson more humbly swindles women by waking their compassion with fabricated stories about his grandmother's failing health. After meeting on a train, they attempt to work together only to find that this small French town isn't big enough for the two. They agree on a settlement; the first one to extract $50,000 from a young female target, heiress Christine Colgate, wins and the other must leave town. A hilarious battle of  the cons ensues that will keep you laughing, humming and guessing to the end!  

 


 
 



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